In Jainism, the day of forgiveness (Kshamavani) is similar in concept to what is observed in other religions, such as Yom Kippur in Judaism or Maslenitsa inspired by Eastern Orthodox traditions. This year, Kshamavani in the Jain calendar falls on 5 Sep 2017. The prayer shown in the photo is translated as follows:

I forgive all living beings.
May all souls forgive me,
I am on friendly terms with all,
I have no animosity toward any soul.
May all my faults be dissolved – please forgive my bad deeds done knowingly or unknowingly

The observance of Kshamavani is described in Wikipedia as follows:

“… micchāmi dukkaḍaṃ is most commonly used on the last day (Samvatsari) of one of the most holy annual Jain events, Paryushana. After pratikramana (Jain prayer, literally meaning “introspection”), Jains seek forgiveness from almost all the creatures of the world whom they may have harmed knowingly or unknowingly by uttering the phrase—micchāmi dukkaḍaṃ. Paryushana frequently falls in August or September during Cāturmāsa, four months into the rainy season. This annual holy time for Jains is reserved for prayers, meditation, introspection, penance, and fasting. Even the wandering monks temporarily abandon their wandering life and settle down amidst laymen, giving discourses and organizing scriptural recitations. Traditionally, letters were sent and telephone calls made to friends and relatives asking their forgiveness.”

Learn more here Wikipedia.org/wiki/Kshamavani

The message conveyed by each person on Kshamavani is as unique as each individual, but may offer a message similar to this one:

“I seek your forgiveness for all the times I may have hurt you knowingly or unknowingly by my words, thoughts or deeds.”

This year, I created the image below as a way of observing and honoring Kshamavani. May the world find a forgiveness and understanding that brings people together working collaboratively toward positive outcomes.

 

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Learn more about shared values at ResourcesForLife.com/values