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“There is nothing in the world’s pleasures, or idols, or forbidden books that can tempt me anymore.” ~ Chaim Kovler, Rosh Hashana 1948, from the film The Quarrel

There’s a perception that the more orthodox religious traditions use charismatic and authoritarian leadership to oppress followers with threats of damnation and thus they establish a wall of fear that will keep believers trapped inside the faith.

Yet those who have had personal interactions with ancient religions will testify that the experience is more like a spiritual pull on one’s heart or soul – not a controlling oppression. It is like being thirsty and seeing a well of fresh, cool, clean water. There’s a connection with The Almighty that transcends whoever the momentary leadership of a religion may be. All falls away, and that connection becomes personal and direct.

Contrary to popular belief, those who are immersed in religious traditions do not cower in sectarian solitude for fear of encountering something in the world that might lure them away from the faith. Solitude, prayer, and meditation are not places of hiding, but places of strengthening.

In the film The Quarrel, Chaim Kovler boldly declares, “There is nothing in the world’s pleasures, or idols, or forbidden books that can tempt me anymore.” He is describing a confidence and peaceful grounded resolve that one arrives at after climbing high enough on the mountain of faith.

The music video below shows the drawing nature of tradition through the eyes of a young Sikh man. The video begins with the young man receiving a text message on his iPhone from some friends asking him to join with them as they go to party at a local bar. The message concludes with the enticement, “BOOZE – GIRLS – FUN” and this starts off the video as the young man heads out to party with his friends.

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